MODERATOR PRINCIPLES IN PRESENTATIONS AND IN PASSING ON A MESSAGE

1. “Good morning. I wish to open up the conference. After the chairperson’s lecture, we will break up into sub-groups. At 11:00 we will come back here for summaries….”

Common Mistake:

Presentation of a timetable and the structure of the meeting/presentation right at the beginning of the meeting/presentation.

Correction:

The opening is a moment of wonderful grace which is created by a curious audience which has specifically come to see the presenter and the uniqueness of his wares. There is no reason to waste this magical moment on boring headlines that can be sent by mail or with materials distributed to the audience before the beginning of the presentation.

What should you do?

Turn the opening stroke into something amazing by using an allegory, a personal story, a provocative experiment, a demonstration of a special project, a teaser question for the audience or an impressive quote — anything that can be done to “plant” the audience in its seat for the rest of the presentation, for the service of the message and in full compatibility with the message.

2. “We have a lot of material to go over today. We need to cover all the information and our time is short….”

Widespread mistake:

To try to cover all the material.

Correction:

A good presentation can effectively pass on one message, perhaps two or three, but no more than that. If you try to pass on 30 messages, just a few will be absorbed and not necessarily according to the priorities of the presenter.

What should you do?

In order for the message to be properly absorbed as the presenter wishes, one should use only one message (at the very most a few) in order to prevent the audience from having free choice. In this way, we will know that the message that was broadcast is the message that has been received.

3. “In the end, you will understand (the token will fall for them …)”

Widespread mistake:

While it is true that there are some people in the audience who have objections, the presentation was created in an orderly manner and therefore, at the end of the lecture/presentation they will understand the intentions and their objections will end.

Correction:

The brain of the audience always objects and flashes –“Objection, objection, objection!!!” – and it doesn’t hear a word that you say (emphasis on a hostile audience). And while you are waiting for the token to fall (and for the audience to understand) no token has fallen and the only one who has been convinced is the presenter himself. Objections must be taken care of immediately, at the opening, while verifying implementation. Otherwise, the presentation will be presented in vain.

What you can do?

A provocative manner, which uses the principles of creative thinking, enables control of the audience’s objections and neatly turns objections into support.

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